ITASA

Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association
Share stuff you like with us! (Click "Share")

info

Posts tagged ITASA

photo

Day 2 of #TACL National Convention: ITASA NB President Monica Chen and Vice President Emily Liu speak to the convention goers about what we do here at ITASA and how we can work together to connect, inspire, and empower the TA community! #itasa #taiwaneseamerican #ta #pipeline #apia #nationalconvention

Day 2 of #TACL National Convention: ITASA NB President Monica Chen and Vice President Emily Liu speak to the convention goers about what we do here at ITASA and how we can work together to connect, inspire, and empower the TA community! #itasa #taiwaneseamerican #ta #pipeline #apia #nationalconvention

photo

Our amazing NBers competing in the shave ice eating competition at 626 Night Market! Shoutout to Faye Chou for dominating and to Eray Wang and Young Po for powering through the brain freeze and putting away a ton of shaved ice as well! #itasa #itasa2014summersummit #summersummit #626nightmarket #shaveice (at 626 Night Market)

Our amazing NBers competing in the shave ice eating competition at 626 Night Market! Shoutout to Faye Chou for dominating and to Eray Wang and Young Po for powering through the brain freeze and putting away a ton of shaved ice as well! #itasa #itasa2014summersummit #summersummit #626nightmarket #shaveice (at 626 Night Market)

text

The recent events in Taiwan have captured the attention of the international community and we feel it is important to recognize Taiwan’s situation. We are lucky to be able to share the perspective of our President, Ada Chen, on the Sunflower Movement.

I have to admit that when I first learned about the protests and occupation of the Legislative Yuan in Taiwan, I was worried. I was on my last Spring Break and instead of relaxing and forgetting about current events, I was constantly refreshing my newsfeed to get more information on what was going on. I was worried about the students, the police and the government officials involved. I was worried that there wasn’t enough English news coverage of the events. Most of all, I was worried for the future of Taiwan.

Read More

text

Sunflower Movement Reflection

Though we are an organization based on cultural identity, we feel it is incredibly important to acknowledge the current events in Taiwan. Our Assistant Philanthropy Director, Annie Chiang, shares her reflections on the Sunflower Movement.

            In the wake of the Sunflower Movement, many Taiwanese citizens, Taiwanese-Americans, and other ‘Taiwanese hyphens have struggled to understand what is happening in Taiwan and how these events fit into our already constructed self-identities. “I am a Taiwanese-American re: CSSTA, #CongressOccupied”, a  recent video produced by Jason Chin, another fellow Taiwanese-American, described the idea of a TaiwaneseAmerican identity in an extremely beautiful and coherent way. He states that the hyphen between his Taiwanese and American identity serve as a bridge between the two, one that serves to enrich either side of him, both communities he belongs to. I came away from the video with a better understanding of how these current events come into play in my self-identity. The history, current events, and future possibilities in the conflicts and relations between Taiwan, China, the KMT, the DPP, those supporting or rejecting the trade pact and any other multiple possible subgroups, although important, do not play a dominant role in my synthesis of the meaning within these events. Rather, I look to what the hyphen between my two identities means.

Read More

text

A Taiwanese American Look at the Sunflower Movement

As we stated before, we feel it is important to recognize recent events in Taiwan as they do not only affect those in Taiwan, but Taiwanese Americans in the United States. Andrea Chu, former Midwest Conference Director, shares an in-depth look at the Sunflower Movement.

Let me paint a picture. The golden age of the American economy, where the US was the uncontested global hegemon after the Second World War, tripped over itself in the 1970s. Inflation, unemployment, and income inequality all rose significantly in the coming decades, contributing to what sociologists call the Great U-Turn, in reference to the receding of hard-earned social progress. Manufacturing jobs disappeared, entire towns across the country falling into despair in their absence. This crisis marked the end of a Fordist industrial capitalism, but as we all know, our economy did not die. It was a phoenix reborn, with new systems and new patterns. Here marked the beginning of advanced capitalism, characterized by a move to service industries and flexible corporate structures.

Read More

photo

For the past 20 years, ITASA has worked to provide resources to connect, inspire and empower Taiwanese American students. Though ITASA is centered around cultural identity and is not affiliated with any political parties or policies, we would be remiss in our dedication to our mission if we failed to acknowledge the recent situation in Taiwan.
The Cross-Strait Services Trade Agreement (CSSTA) was signed in June 2013 by semi-official Taiwanese and Chinese organizations. Later that month, a bipartisan agreement was reached stipulating clause-by-clause review prior to the bill’s passage in the Legislative Yuan. In September, both the Kuomintang (KMT) and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) agreed to hold 16 public hearings concerning the agreement. Discussion surrounding the CSSTA resumed in March 2014 in the Legislative Yuan as a sit-in began outside of the legislature’s building.  An announcement was made on March 17 by Chang Ching-chung, a KMT legislator in charge of convening the legislature’s Internal Administration Committee, that the pact had passed deliberation in the committee and was being sent to final vote on March 21. On March 18 the sit-in outside of the Legislative Yuan began to grow as protestors, including many students, entered the building. Approximately 300 people occupied the building overnight as thousands gathered outside in support.  

On March 23, President Ma Ying-Jeou held a press conference reaffirming his commitment to quickly passing the CSSTA and restating that his actions were not influenced by the Chinese government. Later that evening, protestors stormed the Executive Yuan and were forcibly evicted by riot police by 5AM the next morning. The occupation of the Legislative Yuan continued until April 10th when the students peacefully exited the building.
We hope to encourage dialogue around how these events have affected the Taiwanese American community and have asked current and former National Board members to share their thoughts. You can read them at the following links. 

Ada Chen - National President
Annie Chiang - Assistant Philanthropy Director
 Andrea Chu - Former Midwest Conference Director
 

We welcome you to contribute your own thoughts by submitting to our tumblr or contacting us on our website.

For the past 20 years, ITASA has worked to provide resources to connect, inspire and empower Taiwanese American students. Though ITASA is centered around cultural identity and is not affiliated with any political parties or policies, we would be remiss in our dedication to our mission if we failed to acknowledge the recent situation in Taiwan.

The Cross-Strait Services Trade Agreement (CSSTA) was signed in June 2013 by semi-official Taiwanese and Chinese organizations. Later that month, a bipartisan agreement was reached stipulating clause-by-clause review prior to the bill’s passage in the Legislative Yuan. In September, both the Kuomintang (KMT) and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) agreed to hold 16 public hearings concerning the agreement. Discussion surrounding the CSSTA resumed in March 2014 in the Legislative Yuan as a sit-in began outside of the legislature’s building.  An announcement was made on March 17 by Chang Ching-chung, a KMT legislator in charge of convening the legislature’s Internal Administration Committee, that the pact had passed deliberation in the committee and was being sent to final vote on March 21. On March 18 the sit-in outside of the Legislative Yuan began to grow as protestors, including many students, entered the building. Approximately 300 people occupied the building overnight as thousands gathered outside in support. 

On March 23, President Ma Ying-Jeou held a press conference reaffirming his commitment to quickly passing the CSSTA and restating that his actions were not influenced by the Chinese government. Later that evening, protestors stormed the Executive Yuan and were forcibly evicted by riot police by 5AM the next morning. The occupation of the Legislative Yuan continued until April 10th when the students peacefully exited the building.

We hope to encourage dialogue around how these events have affected the Taiwanese American community and have asked current and former National Board members to share their thoughts. You can read them at the following links. 
Ada Chen - National President
Annie Chiang - Assistant Philanthropy Director
Andrea Chu - Former Midwest Conference Director
 
We welcome you to contribute your own thoughts by submitting to our tumblr or contacting us on our website.

text

BC TCO: Education Panel

by Angel Jehng, ITASA Representative Boston College 

Boston College Taiwanese Cultural Organization has always put an emphasis on education and teaching the BC community about Taiwanese culture. On Tuesday, March 18th, the club hosted “TCO presents: Education Panel” featuring five international students from Shanghai, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Seoul and of course, Taipei. Two students are exchange students, two are undergraduates and the last guest is a graduate student. The featured panelists generously spent time speaking about their educational systems in their respective home countries and answered any questions other BC students had about their education development. It is always interesting hearing about Asian educational systems and how they vary from country to country. Most BC students undergo the traditional American educational system so hearing about the different priorities, struggles and overall experiences is eye-opening. At the end of the day, despite the differences of our educational upbringing, every person in the room ended up at Boston College and is sharing our lives through the same educational institution.

 image

Read More

text

TASA Spotlight: Cornell University

By Jerry Chien, ITASA Representative Cornell University

We’re not just an Org, we are a family!

CTAS stands for Cornell Taiwanese American Society. Because Cornell is relatively isolated, our sense of community is especially strong, and CTAS is no exception. Our members are extremely tight-knit, with the majority showing up to every event we hold. We hold weekly general body meetings with activities ranging from painting paper umbrellas to a simple dinner to promote bonding. CTAS is no small commitment, but at almost any time of the day, you can find at least two of us talking about or planning the next event. Though we are not a particularly large culture club, our sense of community within makes us arguably the most engaging one!

image

 

We always kick-off the year with our annual bubble tea social on Cornell’s largest academic quad where members of the executive board serve free authentic bubble tea that comes straight from Taiwan! As our main recruiting event, we go all out in order to both promote our club and make sure all the new freshmen who pass by get to try some delicious bubble tea.

 

Read More

text

Do you want to go to TAIWAN for the summer?

You have always heard about how people (and ITASA) described Taiwan about the people, the food, and the place. Now, there is finally a chance for YOU to go! Apply now!

Mosaic Taiwan is a fellowship exchange program for emerging US leaders wishing to gain firsthand experience of the Republic of China (Taiwan), a vibrant Asian democracy where traditional Chinese culture has prospered. 

http://www.mosaictaiwan.net/

Also, just to lure you to apply: check out the food below!
http://travel.cnn.com/explorations/eat/40-taiwanese-food-296093

text

Event Recap: Culture Night with CMU TSA!

By Hank Hwang, ITASA Representative

On Saturday November 23, CMU TSA hosted our annual Culture Night. For CMU TSA, we have two big events a year, one in the fall and one in the spring. For fall, it is Culture Night. Culture night is an annual performance that TSA holds to showcase the variety of cultures within the Carnegie Mellon community.

Read More

Following